Californians will wake up on January 1st, 2018 with New Laws

Californians will wake up on January 1st, 2018 with New Laws

December 30, 2017

Californians will wake up on January 1st, 2018 with new laws, here are few laws that will affect, students. job seekers, employers, voters here is a list of a few laws. 

 

1. Vehicle registration fee increase: As part of SB 1, drivers will pay between $25 and $175 more for vehicle registration at DMV. The fee, which goes into effect Jan. 1, is based on the vehicle's current value, as follows:

 

Vehicles worth between $0 and $4,999: $25 fee increase

Vehicles worth between $5,000 and $24,999: $50 fee increase

Vehicles worth between $25,000 and $34,999: $100 fee increase

Vehicles worth between $35,000 and $59,999: $150 fee increase

Vehicles worth $60,000 and higher: $175 fee increase

 

2. Recreational-use marijuana: The sale and cultivation of recreational-use marijuana will be legal in California on Jan. 1. By the new year, the state will have to have regulations and processes in place to issue permits for adult-use marijuana businesses. The deadline does not apply to county or city municipalities, as per AB 64.

 

3. Marijuana use in vehicles: Effective Jan. 1, drivers will be prohibited from smoking or ingesting marijuana or marijuana products while driving or riding as a passenger in a vehicle, as part of SB 65.

 

4. Minimum wage increase: For the second year in a row under SB 3, the minimum wage will increase to $11 an hour, beginning Jan. 1, for more than 2 million workers in California. Under the bill, minimum wage went up to $10.50 an hour in 2017 and will go up again to $12 per hour in 2019. It will increase $1 each year to $15 in 2022. However, Gov. Jerry Brown can halt the increase if there is a negative job growth.

 

5. Bars and ride-sharing: Calling for a safe ride home could get even easier, thanks to a new law that goes into effect Jan. 1. AB 711 will allow alcohol companies and businesses to team up with ride shares, like Uber and Lyft, as well as taxi services, to give out vouchers or promo codes for discounted rides.

 

6. Sanctuary state of California: SB 54 restricts the ability of state and local police in California to cooperate with U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, agents. Beginning Jan. 1, law enforcement officers won’t be allowed to ask about someone’s immigration status or hold them for ICE agents, unless that person has been convicted of a crime. In addition, AB 291 prohibits landlords from reporting renters who are in the country illegally.

 

7. Ammunition sales: Beginning Jan. 1, ammunition purchases must be made in person through an authorized firearms and ammo vendor, as per Prop 63, which was approved by voters in November 2016.Ammunition buyers will be allow for online sales of ammunition, but it must be shipped to a licensed vendor from whom the buyer can pick it up. KCRA talked to the owner of an El Dorado County ammunition store that could close due to this new law.

 

8. Gender identity on driver’s licenses: SB 179 removes the requirement that people have to choose either male or female on their identification documents. Transgender people will be able to select “nonbinary” as an option if they do not identify as either male or female. This new choice will be available beginning in 2019.

 

14. Job salary history: Under AB 168, employers will no longer be able to ask job applicants about their salary history, compensation or benefits. Employers will also be required to disclose pay scales for a job if the applicants asks for them.

 

15. Free college: As part of a nationwide push by Democrats to provide free higher education, AB 19 is the first step in that process, waiving the fee for first-time students who enroll full time in California community colleges.

 

16. Neighborhood voting: In an effort to bolster declining voter turnout, SB 450 replaces neighborhood polling places with elections done mainly by mail. Every voter will receive a mail-in ballot, which they can then take to a drop-off location up to four weeks before Election Day.

 

17. Car window tinting: Under the previous law, drivers were prohibited from having tint or any other material or display that “reduces the driver’s clear view through the windshield or side windows." AB 1303  This bill would exempt from that prohibition the application of a clear, colorless, and transparent film material that meets specified standards to the windshield, side, or rear windows of a motor vehicle if the driver has in his or her possession, or within the vehicle, a certificate signed by a dermatologist certifying that the person should be not exposed to ultraviolet rays, as specified.

 

18. Crossing the street: Pedestrians who cross the street while the red hand signal is flashing will no longer be penalized for doing so. Under AB 390, if the flashing red hand symbol appears and there is a countdown to indicate how much time pedestrians have left to cross, walkers are legally permitted to do so.

 

https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/home.xhtml

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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